Consumer Confidence Remains High on the Prairies

By Tyler Sutherland

MIAMI - MAY 20:  Yera Dominguez uses a credit card reader to charge a credit card from a customer for payment at Lorenzo's Italian Market on May 20, 2009 in Miami, Florida. Members of Congress today passed a bill placing new restrictions on companies that issues credit. The vote follows the Senate passage of the bill, which now heads for President Obama's promised signature. The bill will curb sudden interest rate increases and hidden fees, requiring card companies to tell customers of rate increases 45 days in advance. It will also make it harder for people aged below 21 to be issued credit cards.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Canadian consumer confidence held steady for most of the past year, new data from the Harris/Decima-Investor’s Group Index shows.

Manitoba and Saskatchewan stood at 91.0 in the first quarter, the data shows, which was above the national average. The high trend continued all year long, increasing slightly in the second quarter to 91.7. However, in the third quarter, the index dropped to 85.9, but reported a rise again to 88.3 to round out the fourth quarter.

British Columbia had the lowest level of consumer confidence, falling to 81.2 in the second quarter. It closed at 78.4 in the final quarter.

Harris/Decima collected the data through telephone interviews with 2,000 Canadians in February, June, August and November. The margin of error is 2.2 percent.