Roadside Drug-Testing Devices Worked Well in Pilot Project, Public Safety Says

Roadside Drug-Testing Devices Worked Well in Pilot Project, Public Safety Says

By The Canadian Press

Marijuana
A man smokes a marijuana joint during a rally in downtown Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday April 20, 2011. The federal government says new pilot-project results suggest roadside testing devices can be successfully used to detect drug-impaired driving. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

OTTAWA – The federal government says new pilot-project results suggest roadside testing devices can be successfully used to detect drug-impaired driving.

Police officers from seven jurisdictions across Canada collected over 1,140 saliva samples using two kinds of devices between mid-December and early March.

Public Safety Canada says officers reported that the screening devices were easy to use in various weather, temperature and lighting conditions.

The test results are the latest development in the federal plan to legalize recreational marijuana use.

Under recently introduced legislation, police would be able to demand a saliva sample from a driver if they reasonably suspected the person had drugs in their body.

Should the saliva test lead police to believe an offence has been committed, they could order an examination by an evaluating officer or the taking of a blood sample.

CP - The Canadian Press


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