Category Archives: Columns

Food Musings: King + Bannatyne

Food Musings: King + Bannatyne

By Kathryne Grisim (@foodmuser)

King + Bannatyne
King + Bannatyne, 100 King Street (KATHRYNE GRISIM)

King + BannatyneYears ago when I worked in Winnipeg’s Exchange District we could lunch at the King’s Head Pub, or grab dim sum or a noodle bowl and that was about it. Recently, the area has been re-populated with exceptional restaurants and now all you have to do is head in that direction and you are certain to come across one. You will not have any problem remembering where King + Bannatyne is located because it is exactly where the name indicates.

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Right in the Centre — News Must Be Reliable, Verifiable

Right in the Centre — News Must Be Reliable, Verifiable

By Ken Waddell, Neepawa Banner/Neepawa Press

Newspapers
(Newspapers image via Shutterstock)

If all goes according to plan, by the time you read this column, I will have made the following presentation to the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage in Ottawa:

We have been involved full time in newspaper publishing since 1989, when we started up The Neepawa Banner from scratch, in competition with The Neepawa Press, which had been publishing since 1896. In 2010, the Neepawa Press was sold to a major corporation. I declined to sell to that same corporation and by 2015, they sold the Neepawa Press to us. We are pleased to be able to store 120 years of history in our archives.

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The Whiskey Jack Could Soon Be Canada’s National Bird

The Whiskey Jack Could Soon Be Canada’s National Bird

By Roger Currie

Whiskey Jack
A whiskey jack sits on a post in Lake Louise, Alta., Saturday, Dec. 7, 2013. A two-year-long, Canada-wide search has resulted in the gray jay, also known as the whiskey jack, being chosen as Canada’s national bird by the Royal Canadian Geographic Society. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward)

Bravo and hats off to the Royal Canadian Geographic Society. They have spent the past two years finding out which feathered creature is favoured by Canadians to be our national bird.

Despite the fact that we are thought of as a nation of beer drinkers, the winner is — wait for it — the whiskey jack! It’s also known as the grey jay, and it won out over the loon, the snowy owl, the Canada Goose, and the black-capped chickadee.

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Remembrance Forgotten: Jackman-Atkinson

Remembrance Forgotten: Jackman-Atkinson

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, myWestman

Poppy
(Poppies in a field image via Shutterstock)

NEEPAWA, Man. — Some days, looking at the news, the world looks to be standing at the precipice of an all-out war. Tensions are high, with terrorist attacks targeting major cities, conflicts in the Middle East drawing stronger world powers into proxy wars and world leaders, both hopeful and elected, advocating aggression. Refugees are fleeing oppressive and dangerous regimes as those elsewhere in the world look on with skepticism and concern.

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Time to Remember: Chadderton, Williston Never Forgotten

Time to Remember: Chadderton, Williston Never Forgotten

By Roger Currie

Chadderton Lake
Chadderton Lake was named during a ceremony at the Manitoba legislature in honour of Cliff Chadderton on Wednesday, November 9, 2016. (@MBGOVNEWS / TWITTER)

This week is about remembering. For me, it frequently turns thoughts to two friends who are no longer here, but suddenly this year they are strongly connected. Next spring and summer I will make a special trip to the Duck Mountains in southwest Manitoba, and at least dip my toes in the water of Chadderton Lake.

The province has named it in memory of Cliff Chadderton, who was quite possibly Canada’s best-known veteran of World War II. Cliff and I both graduated from Kelvin High School in Winnipeg, and we both attended the University of Manitoba, but neither of us came away with a degree.

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Copyright or Copy-Wrong? Senior Caught Up in Sticky Legislation

Copyright or Copy-Wrong? Senior Caught Up in Sticky Legislation

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, myWestman

Computer Keyboard
A woman uses her computer keyboard to type while surfing the Internet in North Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday, December, 19, 2012. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward)

NEEPAWA, Man. — This week, an 86-year-old woman became the face of Canada’s new copyright infringement legislation. Christine McMillan is being told she has to pay up for a pirated version of Metro 2033, a first-person shooter game in which survivors of nuclear war must kill mutants, that was downloaded from her IP address. She is one of an unknown number of Canadians who have received threatening letters on behalf of copyright holders, known as the Notice and Notice regime, following changes to Canada’s copyright laws.

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If Chicago Can Wait, So Can Winnipeg: Currie

If Chicago Can Wait, So Can Winnipeg: Currie

By Roger Currie

In Canadian football, the Winnipeg Blue Bombers are still in the hunt for the 2016 Grey Cup, but based on the egg they laid last weekend against the Ottawa Redblacks, led by the oldest quarterback in captivity, we sort of have the feeling that at least one more year will pass by before they sip the bubbly. That’s more than a quarter of a century since the Manitoba capital had a football champion to cheer for, and most of the names on their Ring of Honour go back a lot further than that.

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Waste and Want: $31B in Food Waste a Grave Concern

Waste and Want: $31B in Food Waste a Grave Concern

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, myWestman

Food Bank
Artem Mousessian wraps a shipment for delivery at the distribution centre for Moisson Montreal, the largest food bank in Canada, Thursday, January 28, 2016 in Montreal. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz)

NEEPAWA, Man. — Food waste, it’s a bigger problem than we think. According to a VCM International (VCMI) report, Canadians wasted $31 billion worth of food in 2014, that’s close to $900 per person.

VCMI is a research and consulting company that focuses on agriculture, aquaculture, marine and food industries, but identifying and reducing food waste is one their main areas of expertise.

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A Penny for Your Thoughts

A Penny for Your Thoughts

By Roger Currie

PennyDoes anyone out there miss the dear old one cent coin? It’s been almost three years since we stopped using them in Canada. Is it time to think about scrapping the 5-cent piece, the nickel? The folks at the Royal Canadian Mint have done some studies on the subject, but they’re not prepared to say much about them.

Back in the 1950s, a nickel would buy a few cavities at the candy counter, and if you got in trouble somewhere it paid for a phone call home.

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Telling Stories: Manitoba’s Cattle Industry

Telling Stories: Manitoba’s Cattle Industry

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, myWestman

Cattle Farm

NEEPAWA, Man. — For an industry wanting to tell its story, it’s impossible to overstate the importance of information. For the agricultural industry, the time to gather that information is now. In the coming years, the industry is going to face an increasing number of outside challenges, from concerns over the environmental impacts of various agricultural activities, to the pricing of carbon that we know is coming sooner or later, the industry needs to be able to tell its story with facts and figures.

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