Tag Archives: Vancouver

Message of Love, Tolerance Spread at Anti-Racism Rally in Vancouver

Message of Love, Tolerance Spread at Anti-Racism Rally in Vancouver

By Gemma Karstens-Smith, The Canadian Press

Vancouver
Thousands of people gather outside Vancouver City Hall as anti-racism protesters and opposing protesters take part in rallies in Vancouver, B.C., on Saturday, August 19, 2017. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

VANCOUVER – Messages of love, tolerance and understanding were shared by thousands of people who gathered on Saturday to protest racism and hate.

Signs reading “live with love,” “diversity = strength” and “laundry is the only thing that should be separated by colour” were spotted above a packed crowd outside Vancouver’s city hall.

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‘Deadpool 2’ Accident a Rarity in Industry That Takes Precautions: Stunt Pros

‘Deadpool 2’ Accident a Rarity in Industry That Takes Precautions: Stunt Pros

By Victoria Ahearn, The Canadian Press

Deadpool Accident
A police officer examines a motorcycle after a female stunt driver working on the movie “Deadpool 2” died after a crash on set, in Vancouver, B.C., on Monday August 14, 2017. Monday’s deadly crash on the set of “Deadpool 2” is a rarity in an industry that takes extreme precautions to ensure safety but acknowledges there is always an element of risk involved, say stunt professionals. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

TORONTO – Monday’s deadly crash on the set of “Deadpool 2” in Vancouver was a rarity in an industry that takes extreme precautions to ensure safety, say stunt professionals, who nevertheless accept there is always an element of risk involved.

“Most of us know each other and everybody was shocked, because this stuff just doesn’t really happen, in Canada, anyway,” says Neven Pajkic, a 39-year-old Toronto-based stunt performer whose credits include Guillermo del Toro’s upcoming film “The Shape of Water” and the TV series “The Handmaid’s Tale.”

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B.C. Wildfire Season Worst in Six Decades, Still Far from Over: Official

B.C. Wildfire Season Worst in Six Decades, Still Far from Over: Official

By Geordon Omand, The Canadian Press

Wildfire
A wildfire is seen from a Canadian Forces Chinook helicopter as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau views areas affected by wildfire near Williams Lake, B.C., on Monday July 31, 2017. British Columbia is experiencing its most destructive wildfire season in 60 years.Kevin Skrepnek of the BC Wildfire Service says 4,910 square kilometres of forest, brush and grassland have been torched, making this year the second worst in recorded history in terms of land lost. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

VANCOUVER – This year’s wildfire season has become British Columbia’s worst in six decades, and a provincial spokesman says the action is far from over.

Kevin Skrepnek of the BC Wildfire Service said Thursday that 4,910 square kilometres of forest, bush and grassland have been torched, making 2017 the second worst year in recorded history in terms of land destroyed.

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Longboard Rider Faces Legal Battle After $598 Ticket for Using Electric Board

Longboard Rider Faces Legal Battle After $598 Ticket for Using Electric Board

By Beth Leighton, The Canadian Press

Boosted Board

VANCOUVER – A Vancouver man has pulled the plug on his electric skateboard after receiving a $598 ticket the first time he took it out on the street.

Daniel Dahlberg said he was riding the longboard, marketed as a Boosted Board, on Friday down a hill in Vancouver’s Kitsilano neighbourhood when he was pulled over by police.

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Reeling in Canada’s Hot Real Estate Market

Reeling in Canada’s Hot Real Estate Market

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, myWestman

For Sale
A sold sign is pictured outside a home in Vancouver, B.C., Tuesday, June, 28, 2016. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward)

NEEPAWA, Man. — Like an impending disaster, the housing market in two of Canada’s largest cities is hard to take your eyes off of. While we may be watching from a safe distance, one way or another, it’s going to have an impact across the country.

A decade ago, our decision to move back to Manitoba was prompted in part by the high housing prices in Vancouver. Over the last 10 years, prices have only climbed higher. In January 2016, the average price for detached houses in the Lower Mainland (which includes more than just the city of Vancouver), hit a high of $1.83 million, well beyond the reach of most average homeowners.

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Fentanyl Trafficking Presents New Challenges for Police, Experts Say

Fentanyl Trafficking Presents New Challenges for Police, Experts Say

By Linda Givetash, The Canadian Press

Fentanyl Art
A man walks past a mural by street artist Smokey D. about the fentanyl and opioid overdose crisis, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, B.C., on Thursday December 22, 2016. Illicit drugs have always been a problem in port cities, but experts say the emergence of highly potent synthetic opioids that are fuelling British Columbia’s overdose crisis are slipping through borders in new ways, presenting challenges for law enforcement. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

VANCOUVER – Illicit drugs have always been a problem in port cities, but experts say the emergence of highly potent synthetic opioids that are fuelling British Columbia’s overdose crisis are slipping through borders in new ways, presenting challenges for law enforcement.

International regulations, online ordering and the potency of the drug are among the factors making it difficult to prevent the drug from slipping through Canada’s borders.

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Raptors Lock Arms During Anthems Ahead of Pre-Season Game Against Warriors

Raptors Lock Arms During Anthems Ahead of Pre-Season Game Against Warriors

By Joshua Clipperton, The Canadian Press

Toronto Raptors
Toronto Raptors players lock arms during the singing of the national anthems before a pre-season NBA basketball game against the Golden State Warriors in Vancouver, B.C., on Saturday October 1, 2016. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

VANCOUVER – True to their word, the Toronto Raptors took a stand on Saturday by locking arms during the national anthems prior to a pre-season game against the Golden State Warriors.

Players and staff stood arm in arm during both the “Star-Spangled Banner” and “O Canada” at Rogers Arena, with some bowing their heads.

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Why Are All of These Things Just Like the Others?

Why Are All of These Things Just Like the Others?

Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup
(GREAT CANADIAN SHORELINE CLEANUP / VANCOUVER AQUARIAM MARINE SCIENCE CENTRE)

(NC) — What do food wrappers, fishing line, a taxidermy wiener dog, duck photos, bottle caps and a toy dinosaur have in common? They are all things left on Canadian shorelines, and they are all things that originated from people.

In 2014, the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre and WWF-Canada’s Great Canadian Shoreline cleanup, presented by Loblaw Companies Limited, removed more than 139,000 kilograms of litter from shorelines across Canada, equivalent to filling roughly 70 dump trucks. From the usual cigarette butts, bottle caps and plastic bags to the unusual drone, monocle and duck decoy, the message comes through loud and clear: the damaged state of our shorelines is the result of human activities and behaviour.

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Double Trouble, Not Double-Double for Suspected Vancouver Van Thief

Double Trouble, Not Double-Double for Suspected Vancouver Van Thief

By The Canadian Press

Smashed Car Window
(Smashed vehicle window image via Shutterstock)

VANCOUVER – Thieves take note — if you plan to steal a delivery van, have your morning coffee before committing the crime.

A 55-year-old man is pondering that lesson while awaiting a Sept. 30 court date in Vancouver.

Brian Phillips faces various charges after a delivery van was stolen from downtown Vancouver early Monday morning.

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