Canadian Ski Cross Racer Apologizes for Behaviour After Drunken Joyride in Pyeongchang

Canadian Ski Cross Racer Apologizes for Behaviour After Drunken Joyride in Pyeongchang

By The Canadian Press

Dave Duncan
Canadian ski cross racer Dave Duncan is apologizing for “behaviour that demonstrated poor judgement” after being released from jail following an alleged drunken joyride at the Pyeongchang Games. Dave Duncan of Canada competes in the Men’s Ski Cross Seeding run at Phoenix Snow Park during the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic Winter Games in PyeongChang, South Korea on February 21, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-COC/Vaughn Ridley)

PYEONGCHANG, South Korea – Canadian ski cross racer Dave Duncan is apologizing for “behaviour that demonstrated poor judgement” after being released from jail following an alleged drunken joyride at the Pyeongchang Games.

The Canadian Olympic Committee confirmed in a statement Sunday that Duncan, his wife Maja and Canadian technical coach William Raine had been detained by police in South Korea and were now released. The statement came after an investigator with the Gangwon Provincial Police Department told The Canadian Press the two Canadians and an American woman were arrested for allegedly drunk driving and stealing a car.

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Manitoba’s Community Kitchens Land Funding Injection

Manitoba’s Community Kitchens Land Funding Injection

By David Klassen

Kitchen Appliances - Stove Dishwasher

Eight community centres across Manitoba are receiving new commercial-grade kitchen equipment as part of an $84,000 investment by the province.

The Manitoba government says the funding is a boost to the future of food innovation, product development and gives an upper hand to entrepreneurs in the province.

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Jackman-Atkinson: Divided We Fall

Jackman-Atkinson: Divided We Fall

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Neepawa Banner & Press

Cell Phone

NEEPAWA, Man. — Left versus right, urban versus rural, new immigrants versus established Canadians, we are becoming an increasingly divided society. Along religious lines, political lines, age and gender, we are becoming increasingly polarized. While a relatively small group of publishers and news media used to keep the majority of Canadians on the same track, on the world-wide-web, fringe beliefs are now as easily accessible as ones commonly held. While the internet has put the world at our fingertips, by offering a myriad of viewpoints, it has also helped to divide us.

Polarization and divisiveness is the end result of a number of factors. The first is that we tend to look for news and stories that support our existing beliefs. This summer, a team of journalists released a study called “Inside The Partisan Fight For Your News Feed.” Among the findings were just how little people cross the ideological divide. The report included the findings of researchers at King’s College and University College London, in England, which looked at the upstream traffic of partisan websites, that is, the sites previously visited. They were able to get analytics for 483 sites and it showed a clear pattern of traffic to partisan websites coming from other partisan websites.

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‘Our Babies Are Not Safe:’ March in Winnipeg for Tina Fontaine’s Family

‘Our Babies Are Not Safe:’ March in Winnipeg for Tina Fontaine’s Family

By Bill Graveland, The Canadian Press

Raymond Cormier Verdict
From left, Grand Chief Jerry Daniels, Southern Chiefs’ Organization, Chief Arlen Dumas, Chief Derrick Henderson of Sagkeeng, Chief Sheila North, and Chief Kevin Hart speak to media outside the law courts in Winnipeg after the jury delivered a not-guilty verdict in the second degree murder trial of Raymond Cormier, Thursday, February 22, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods)

WINNIPEG – Hundreds marched through the streets of Winnipeg a day after a jury acquitted a man accused of killing a 15-year-old Indigenous girl whose body, wrapped in a blanket and weighed down by rocks, was pulled from a river.

The three-block-long march in support of Tina Fontaine’s family began Friday in front of the courthouse and wound its way to the spot at the Red River where the teen’s body was found in August 2014.

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Manitoba’s Flood Risk Low, But All Eyes on Future Weather

Manitoba’s Flood Risk Low, But All Eyes on Future Weather

Westbourne Flooding
A water-logged ditch and culverts on Highway 16 just west of Westbourne, Manitoba on Sunday, April 2, 2017. (CHRISD.CA FILE)

WINNIPEG — The lack of snowpack in Manitoba this winter is turning out to be positive news on the flood front.

The province on Friday released its first spring flood outlook for the season, highlighting there’s little to worry about once what little snow we do have begins to melt.

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Trudeau’s Fashion Missteps Highlight What Not to Wear on Vacation

Trudeau’s Fashion Missteps Highlight What Not to Wear on Vacation

By Cassandra Szklarski, The Canadian Press

Justin Trudeau
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, right, his wife Sophie Gregoire Trudeau, left, their daughter Ella Grace and son Xavier pose with Bollywood actor Shah Rukh Khan, second left, in Mumbai. (SEAN KILPATRICK / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

TORONTO – The traditional garb that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his family have adopted in India has raised eyebrows around the world, but travel experts say that shouldn’t dissuade Westerners from trying to honour local norms when they head overseas.

Canada’s first family appeared in relatively demure attire as Trudeau donned a suit to tour one of India’s largest mosques Thursday, with wife Sophie in a yellow floral dress and their kids in matching striped button-downs.

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