Deer with Purple Hammock Twined in Its Antlers to Be Freed

Deer with Purple Hammock Twined in Its Antlers to Be Freed

By The Canadian Press

Deer
“Hammy” is seen in this undated handout photo sitting in the backyard of Prince Rupert, B.C., resident Sharon Cameron. Help is on the way for Hammy, the northwestern British Columbia buck whose unusual antler adornment has endeared him to area residents and turned him into an Internet sensation. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Sharon Cameron)

PRINCE RUPERT, B.C. – Help is on the way for Hammy, the northwestern British Columbia buck whose unusual antler adornment has endeared him to area residents and turned him into an internet sensation.

The Conservation Officer Service says part of a purple hammock entangled in the deer’s antlers could endanger him, or another deer, as mating season gets underway and male deer butt heads to establish mating rights.

Conservation officers did not originally plan to intervene, saying the problem would correct itself when Hammy shed his antlers over the winter, but they believe they can step in now, without causing any harm.

The buck, dubbed Hammy because of the hammock frill, became entangled in a backyard hammock in Prince Rupert in August.

He had to be cut free by RCMP officers, but ran off before they could remove a clump of debris from his antlers.

Since then, Hammy has been seen numerous times around the city and his seemingly jaunty attitude toward the purple headgear led to a dedicated Facebook page.

It even prompted a local entrepreneur to create a line of T-shirts that sold out almost instantly.

Sgt. Tracy Walbauer with the Conservation Officer Service said members are visiting Prince Rupert and have decided to act.

“The concern is now that with the rut being on, he may get entangled with another deer as sparring is pretty common practice when they’re in the breeding season,” Walbauer said.

“Our plan is to tranquilize him and cut the hammock off of his antler and then release him.”

Walbauer is asking Prince Rupert residents to call the conservation service’s toll-free reporting number if they spot Hammy, so officers can find and assist the buck. (CJFW)

CP - The Canadian Press

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