Tag Archives: Canada

Cigarette Packs with Graphic Images, Blunt Warnings Are Effective: Focus Groups

Cigarette Packs with Graphic Images, Blunt Warnings Are Effective: Focus Groups

By Janice Dickson, The Canadian Press

Smoking

OTTAWA – One image shows a woman’s torso with a cigarette being burned into her bladder through underwear.

Another depicts a man holding a colostomy bag, adding the words, “You may need to use a bag as a toilet for the rest of your life.”

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Loblaw Recalls No Name Chicken Nuggets Due to Possible Salmonella Contamination

Loblaw Recalls No Name Chicken Nuggets Due to Possible Salmonella Contamination

The Canadian Press

Chicken Nuggets Recall
No Name Chicken Nuggets (CFIA)

OTTAWA – Loblaw Companies Ltd. is recalling certain No Name brand Chicken Nuggets due to possible salmonella contamination.

The nuggets were sold in 907 gram packages (UPC code 0 60383 89685 0) and should be thrown out or returned to the store where they were purchased.

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Growing Knowledge: From the Farm to the Table

Growing Knowledge: From the Farm to the Table

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Neepawa Banner & Press

Cattle - Cow

Agricultural topics don’t often make front page news in Canada’s biggest city, especially when it’s not bad news. But that wasn’t the case this week, when the Toronto Star published an investigative piece looking at organic and conventional milk in Canada. The feature ran under a special header and could be found at the top of their website for most of the week.

Milked, by Michele Henry, followed milk from farm to consumer. It was an extensive piece of journalism, involving farm visits, store purchases and lab analysis. The work began last winter and milk tested was purchased in February. In writing the story, Henry visited multiple conventional and organic dairy farms to talk to producers about their operations.

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Sports Highlights

A Year After ‘Despacito’ Has Latin Music Found a Permanent Home on Canadian Radio?

A Year After ‘Despacito’ Has Latin Music Found a Permanent Home on Canadian Radio?

By David Friend, The Canadian Press

LOLAA
Toronto-based sisters and music duo behind the pop group ‘LOLAA’, Lex Valentine, right, and Nadia Valerie King pose for a photograph in Toronto on Wednesday, June 13, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette)

TORONTO – Singer Alx Veliz is certain that a recent swell in the popularity of Latin music is signalling a change of tastes with many Canadian listeners.

He points to the numerous Latin songs that broke into mainstream consciousness across the country last year, led by the colossal hit, “Despacito,” performed by Luis Fonsi, Daddy Yankee, and Justin Bieber. Veliz’s 2016 hit single “Dancing Kizomba” left its own mark when it was released in an alternate Spanish version.

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New National Campaign Launched to Reduce Household Food Waste

New National Campaign Launched to Reduce Household Food Waste

By Magdaline Boutros, The Canadian Press

Beef - Vegetables

MONTREAL – Every day, an estimated 2.4 million Canadian potatoes are thrown in the trash.

That’s along with 1.2 million apples, one million cups of milk, 750,000 loaves of bread and 450,000 eggs tossed every day, for a total of 2.2 million tonnes of edible food waste per year, according to the authors of a new campaign to reduce food waste.

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Trudeau Shuffles Familiar Faces, Adds New Ones to Expanded Cabinet

Trudeau Shuffles Familiar Faces, Adds New Ones to Expanded Cabinet

By The Canadian Press

Justin Trudeau
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau holds a press conference at the NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium, on Thursday, July 12, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick)

OTTAWA – Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has unveiled his pre-election cabinet, shuffling six ministers to new portfolios and promoting five other MPs to his front benches in a bid to boost the profile of his team.

Trudeau confidant and long-time MP Dominic LeBlanc moves from fisheries to take on intergovernmental affairs, placing a veteran in charge of unpredictable federal-provincial relations.

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Invasive Species Known as the Zombie Plant Present in Waterways of Five Provinces

Invasive Species Known as the Zombie Plant Present in Waterways of Five Provinces

By Peter Rakobowchuk, The Canadian Press

Eurasian Watermilfoil
A handful of Eurasian watermilfoil that washed up on a beach in Eastern Ontario is shown in a handout photo. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO- Barbara King/Watersheds Canada)

MONTREAL – An invasive plant species that has become a worrisome problem in Quebec lakes and rivers is also present in four other provinces as well as in almost every U.S. state.

Barbara King, executive director of the non-profit Watersheds Canada, says the species is known to occur in New Brunswick, Ontario, Manitoba and British Columbia.

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Cull Hasn’t Been Able to Solve Bunny Burden in Alberta Mountain Town of Canmore

Cull Hasn’t Been Able to Solve Bunny Burden in Alberta Mountain Town of Canmore

By The Canadian Press

Rabbits
Feral rabbits are shown in Canmore, Alta., on November 22, 2011. Canmore has spent almost $400,000 to rid the town of feral rabbits but the problem persists and residents remain divided over the controversial cull program. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Bill Graveland)

CANMORE, Alta. – Problems persist in an Alberta mountain town overrun with rabbits despite an ongoing cull that has cost almost $400,000.

Canmore introduced its feral rabbit management program six years ago after much pro- and anti-bunny bickering and outcries from animal rights advocates.

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Physicians Urge Ottawa to Pay Another $21B Over Decade for Seniors Health Care

Physicians Urge Ottawa to Pay Another $21B Over Decade for Seniors Health Care

By Andy Blatchford, The Canadian Press

Emergency Department
Northumberland Hills Hospital in Cobourg, Ont., is shown on Saturday, Oct. 28, 2017. Physicians are calling on the federal government to shell out another $21 billion over the next decade to help provinces and territories pay for soaring health care costs that will be propelled by the unavoidable growth of Canada’s seniors population. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn)

OTTAWA – Physicians are calling on the federal government to shell out another $21 billion over the next decade to help provinces and territories pay for soaring health care costs that will be propelled by the unavoidable growth of Canada‘s seniors population.

A new analysis, to be released Tuesday by the Canadian Medical Association, is urging Ottawa to provide bigger and bigger annual top-ups to the existing federal health care transfer program.

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Trudeau’s Youth Council Divided Over Trans Mountain Pipeline Purchase

Trudeau’s Youth Council Divided Over Trans Mountain Pipeline Purchase

By Lee Berthiaume, The Canadian Press

Justin Trudeau
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau holds a press conference at the NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium, on Thursday, July 12, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick)

OTTAWA – Fissures have appeared inside Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s youth council after a group of current and former members publicly urged the Liberal government to reverse its decision to buy Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline.

The request was made in a letter to the prime minister signed by 16 past and present members of the council and released to the public on Monday, in which signatories expressed “our immense disappointment” with the planned $4.5-billion pipeline purchase.

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