Category Archives: Columns

Decline to Be Heard: Jackman-Atkinson

Decline to Be Heard: Jackman-Atkinson

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Neepawa Banner & Press

Voting Ballot
(Voting ballot image via Shutterstock)

NEEPAWA, Man. — It’s a familiar process. You show up at the polling station, get your ballot and mark an “X” by the candidate you wish to elect. But what if you don’t want to vote for any of them?

We are about to enter the next cycle of elections and as voters head into the voting booths, they have more options than they might think.

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When Three’s Not a Crowd: Jackman-Atkinson

When Three’s Not a Crowd: Jackman-Atkinson

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Neepawa Banner & Press

Dougald Lamont
Manitoba Liberal Leader Dougald Lamont addresses supporters after winning a provincial byelection in Winnipeg on Tuesday, July 17, 2018. Armed with a new legislature seat and more clout for his long-suffering party, Manitoba Liberal Leader Dougald Lamont says he intends to fight against the Progressive Conservative government’s cost-cutting agenda and for public spending to stimulate the economy and reduce the deficit. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Steve Lambert)

NEEPAWA, Man. — Westman residents can be forgiven for forgetting that a provincial byelection just took place. While usually dull affairs, that wasn’t the case this time and the outcome could have an interesting impact on the province’s political future.

When the polls closed in the St. Boniface riding on July 17, the results were surprising.

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Canadian Internet Stuck in the Slow Lane: Jackman-Atkinson

Canadian Internet Stuck in the Slow Lane: Jackman-Atkinson

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Neepawa Banner & Press

Internet - Laptop

NEEPAWA, Man. — Last week I was irritated to once again be unable to make a phone call travelling between Minnedosa and Brandon. Then I heard about the “upgrades” to mobile service in the Alonsa area.

It was reported that in the six weeks since two towers were upgraded, one in Amaranth and one at Ebb and Flow, area users found that they now have almost no service at all.

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Food Musings: Era Bistro at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Food Musings: Era Bistro at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights

By Kathryne Grisim (@foodmuser)

Era Bistro
(KATHRYNE GRISIM PHOTO)

In the same manner that the Canadian Museum for Human Rights elevates our city to a national (even international) tourism level, Era Bistro elevates the museum to even higher heights. I have had the pleasure of noshing at the at the Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art in New York, The Musee D’Orsay in Paris, The Holocaust Museum in Jerusalem and more recently the Ufizzi Gallery in Florence. All were tasty enough but none had the integrity of local produce and regional menu as Era does.

I have met both the director of food and beverage and the executive chef at Era Bistro. The former, named Toni, is gluten intolerant and strives to give persons with this, vegan and vegetarian preferences plenty of menu choices. On the lunch menu alone there were nine delicious options. I enjoyed the gluten free Quinoa Salad on my visit.

Read the full review of Era Bistro on FoodMusings.ca.

Growing Knowledge: From the Farm to the Table

Growing Knowledge: From the Farm to the Table

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Neepawa Banner & Press

Cattle - Cow

Agricultural topics don’t often make front page news in Canada’s biggest city, especially when it’s not bad news. But that wasn’t the case this week, when the Toronto Star published an investigative piece looking at organic and conventional milk in Canada. The feature ran under a special header and could be found at the top of their website for most of the week.

Milked, by Michele Henry, followed milk from farm to consumer. It was an extensive piece of journalism, involving farm visits, store purchases and lab analysis. The work began last winter and milk tested was purchased in February. In writing the story, Henry visited multiple conventional and organic dairy farms to talk to producers about their operations.

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Baring (and Sharing) Our SOUL: Conference Spotlights the Best of Winnipeg

Baring (and Sharing) Our SOUL: Conference Spotlights the Best of Winnipeg

By Donovan Toews and Christopher Leach

Winnipeg Skyline

There’s no question about it — the heartbeat of Winnipeg has been thumping loud and clear and full of pride. While the nation watched, tens of thousands of citizens flocked to fill downtown streets to cheer on our own Winnipeg Jets in their hopeful pursuit of the coveted Stanley Cup. Window after window was covered with “Go Jets Go!” made from ‘borrowed’ office paper. Social media exploded with “We are Winnipeg” and Bhangra-dancing Winnipeg Jets fans. What’s undeniably clear: Winnipeg is at its best right now and only getting better. It’s gritty. It’s authentic. It has soul. This prairie soul will be on full display at the upcoming Canadian Institute of Planners conference from July 19-22 as hundreds of planners, engineers, architects, elected officials, and designers from across the country arrive in Winnipeg to tell stories, share ideas and contemplate their respective roles in the field of city-building.

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How Lo(cal) Can You Go? Shopping at Home a Big Boost to Small Business

How Lo(cal) Can You Go? Shopping at Home a Big Boost to Small Business

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Neepawa Banner & Press

Open Sign

We all know the importance of small businesses to our economy, but what about the smallest of small? In the season of farmers markets and pop up shops, all of a sudden, we see the talent hiding in plain sight.

The sewing, baking, crafting, painting, pottery, woodworking and anything you can imagine, are all on display. Locally made and locally sold, it’s the epitome of shopping local.

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Higher Education: Too Much of a Good Thing?

Higher Education: Too Much of a Good Thing?

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, editor, myWestman.ca

Construction Worker

NEEPAWA, Man. — I hold a commerce degree and during university, we had many chances to interact with those already in the workforce. Whether it was in-class presentations, networking events or hiring fairs, the message was always the same, “School is great, but you’ll learn what you actually need to know once you start working.” I don’t think that commerce grads are unique in this experience.

For many young Canadians, post-secondary education opens their eyes to life and ideas. It can be a transformative experience, but as an educational necessity for a job or career, can you have too much of a good thing? Post-secondary degrees no longer guarantee entry to the middle or upper classes and students are being saddled with increasing levels of debt as the cost of education rises.

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