Category Archives: Columns

Tender Feelings: Questions Remain Surrounding Manitoba’s Crown Land Tenders

Tender Feelings: Questions Remain Surrounding Manitoba’s Crown Land Tenders

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Neepawa Banner & Press

Farm
(Summer farm image via Shutterstock)

NEEPAWA, Man. — For a while, there has been talk about the need to modernize the regulations that govern Manitoba’s Agriculture Crown Lands (ACL). In December, the provincial government announced that changes were coming and last month, we found out what a least some of those changes will be.

There are about 1.45 million acres of land that the provincial government rents or leases to individual farmers for grazing or hay production and another 11,000 acres leased for cropping. For some livestock producers, Crown land forms an integral part of their operation. Crown land rental and lease rates are inexpensive, but the use of the land does come with limitations; such as how it can be used and that it must remain accessible to the public.

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Trading Places Beyond Provincial Borders: Jackman-Atkinson

Trading Places Beyond Provincial Borders: Jackman-Atkinson

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, myWestman.ca

Prairie Field Wind

NEEPAWA, Man. — While most people think of trade agreements in international terms, trade between provinces isn’t always as free as we think. In November 2016, Manitoba joined the New West Partnership, which aims to create a western Canadian free trade zone. The goal of the agreement is to allow for the better mobility of trade, investment and labour, with the end result of reducing costs. The original partnership was signed between British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan in 2010 and came into effect in 2013.

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Of Combines and Code: Opening the Right to Openly Diagnose Broken Tech

Of Combines and Code: Opening the Right to Openly Diagnose Broken Tech

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Neepawa Banner & Press

Tractors

NEEPAWA, Man. — What do a tractor and Microsoft Word have in common? A lot, if equipment manufacturers get their way. For close to a decade, automobile manufacturers have been governed by Right to Repair legislation. In Canada, this voluntary agreement came into effect in 2009 and requires manufacturers to make key software and training available to independent garages, which allows someone other than the dealership to access a vehicle’s software in order to diagnose and repair problems. Given the increasing level of computer control on modern vehicles, such access is required for almost all repairs. Automobile owners can also take it one step further, all vehicles must use the same data port, meaning owners can purchase inexpensive scanners to do their own diagnostics.

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What’s in a Checkup? Regular Checkups Are Key to Your Dental Health

What’s in a Checkup? Regular Checkups Are Key to Your Dental Health

Presented by:
Manitoba Dentist

Dentist

Some people have a strange attitude towards checkups. They think that if the dentist doesn’t find something wrong, they’ve wasted their time. A series of successful checkups can discourage people from ever seeing their dentist again.

The idea that you should only see your dentist when something is wrong with your teeth may end up costing you a lot of money, time and comfort. Your dentist can detect and treat most dental problems before you’re even aware of them.

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Manitoba Hydro’s Rate Increase Exceptional, But Unacceptable

Manitoba Hydro’s Rate Increase Exceptional, But Unacceptable

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Neepawa Banner & Press

Hydro Tower
A hydro tower is seen in Toronto on Wednesday, November 4, 2015. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabres)

NEEPAWA, Man. — Public hearings are currently underway and their outcome will determine how much Manitobans will be held responsible for past government action. Right now, the province’s Public Utilities Board is hearing arguments for and against an increase in Manitoba Hydro rates, which Patti Ramage, Manitoba Hydro’s legal council, called “exceptional.”

The proposed increase calls for rates to rise 7.9 percent per year until 2023/2024, the increases would then fall to what Hydro calls “sustainable” levels. The cumulative effect of those increases will see rates rise close to 60 percent above current levels.

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Three of the Most Common Myths Surrounding Chiropractic Treatment Explained

Three of the Most Common Myths Surrounding Chiropractic Treatment Explained

Presented by Markham Chiropractic Centre

Markham Chiropractic Centre

MYTH 1

Once you see a chiropractor you have to keep going back

This is false. When seeking care from a chiropractor, the chiropractor will perform an assessment including a history and physical examination to determine the cause of the pain or dysfunction. From these observations, a diagnosis will be made and the treatment plan developed in collaboration with the patient – according to their needs and goals. The treatment plan will recommend a number of initial visits to see how the patient responds to care and scheduled re-evaluations. Depending on the patient and the condition, the recommended course of care may vary. Some patients only want their symptoms resolved and the underlying problem corrected while others choose to come in for periodic wellness adjustments to maintain/improve their health. Ultimately, the decision to continue care is yours.

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Return to Local: Jackman-Atkinson

Return to Local: Jackman-Atkinson

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Neepawa Banner & Press

School Classroom

NEEPAWA, Man. — The management of schools in Nova Scotia will look a lot different this fall. At the end of January, the provincial government announced that they would be implementing 22 recommendations from a consultant’s report on educational administration, aimed at improving student outcomes. One of the recommendations that have drawn the most publicity is the elimination of the province’s seven English language school boards.

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Investing in Manitoba’s Agricultural Future: Jackman-Atkinson

Investing in Manitoba’s Agricultural Future: Jackman-Atkinson

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Neepawa Banner & Press

Prairie Field Wind

NEEPAWA, Man. — The province’s agricultural industry faces a major challenge when it comes to succession — the high cost of entry. Few other jobs require such a high upfront investment; you don’t need to own a hospital to become a doctor or a school to become a teacher, but you need a farm to be a farmer. The cost of land, equipment, livestock, seed and other inputs is high and only rising. At their recent annual general meeting, Keystone Agricultural Producers, Manitoba’s general farm policy organization, passed a resolution to help combat two problems, with one simple solution. The high cost of entry for young farmers is one problem, while the other is the purchase of farmland as an investment vehicle.

The resolution passed by KAP members last week authorized the organization to lobby the provincial government to look at a five percent levy on farmland sales to any investor who hasn’t been actively farming within the last three years. KAP would like to see the money raised by the levy used to enhance Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation’s Young Farmer Rebate program, which offers reduced interest rates on farm-related loans to borrowers under 40 years of age.

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Peppers & Pennies: Cajun Couscous

Peppers & Pennies: Cajun Couscous

By Amanda Cortens (@PeppersPennies)

 Cajun Couscous

WINNIPEG, Man. — It can be pretty difficult to get excited about side dishes. Rice, salads and roasted veggies all seem to be more of an addition to a meal than the star of the show. It doesn’t have to be that way! All you need is a bit of creativity, spice and 20 minutes to make a flavourful batch of Cajun Couscous!

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Grisim: Tales from ‘Home Away for Home’ at Airbnb in Arizona

Grisim: Tales from ‘Home Away for Home’ at Airbnb in Arizona

Mesa, Arizona
Mesa, Arizona (KATHRYNE GRISIM PHOTO)

Winnipeg-based travel and food writer Kathryne Grisim is continuing to share her experience this past December by trekking her family down to Mesa, Arizona and staying at an Airbnb property.

“The kitchen, oh the kitchen! It was furnished with every single small appliance you could think of including a movie theatre style popcorn maker, George Foreman grill, crockpot and waffle maker,” Grisim writes.

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