Category Archives: Columns

Concern Misplaced for Manitoba Cattle Producers: Jackman-Atkinson

Concern Misplaced for Manitoba Cattle Producers: Jackman-Atkinson

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Neepawa Banner & Press

Cattle - Cow

Government funding that could have been a win-win, for Manitoba farmers and the environment, won’t have nearly the impact it could have had.

Program details show that close to half of the province’s farmers have been shut out of funding for the establishment of cover crops, as funding aimed to help them undertake this beneficial management practice have explicitly shut out cattle producers. Of the province’s 15,000 farms, 6,500 have cattle and the Province is worried the funding could be used as a feed subsidy.

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Meaty Topic: What the Rise in ‘Beyond Meat’ Means for Canadian Farmers

Meaty Topic: What the Rise in ‘Beyond Meat’ Means for Canadian Farmers

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Neepawa Banner & Press

Beef Burger

In North America, Beyond Meat and other plant-based protein products are getting all of the publicity, as the shiny new option in a sea of changing diets. The fact remains that livestock production is an important part of the Canadian economy, accounting for just under half of Canadian farms. Should livestock producers be worried? To answer requires looking at the larger picture — beyond the domestic market.

According to the 2016 Census of Agriculture, Canada was home to about 36,000 beef cattle operations, 10,000 dairy farms, 2,000 chicken egg products farms, 2,100 meat-type chicken operations, 3,300 hog farms and 3,000 sheep and goat farms, out of a total of 193,000 farms.

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Perception and Reality in Today’s Political Climate: Jackman-Atkinson

Perception and Reality in Today’s Political Climate: Jackman-Atkinson

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Neepawa Banner & Press

Justin Trudeau - Donald Trump
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with U.S. President Donald Trump at the White House in Washington, D.C. on Thursday, June 20, 2019. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick)

As a middle of the road Canadian, I look at the political landscape and I’m concerned. Mostly, I’m concerned about the growing divisiveness I see elsewhere in the world and its creep into Canadian politics.

Canadians consume a lot of culture from outside our borders and we’re inundated with the current political climate in both America and Britain. Things aren’t quite so bad here and I always thought it was a function of our three-party system forcing parties to remember their centres. But I’m also seeing more memes, more instances where political opponents are being cast as a threat to democracy and less debate about actual policies. I can’t help but wonder, is it just that we’re slower to pick up on trends?

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Off to Work? Holiday Retail Closures Missing the Mark

Off to Work? Holiday Retail Closures Missing the Mark

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Editor, myWestman.ca

Store Open Sign

On any statutory holiday, at any time of the day or night, I can make a few taps on my phone and buy just about anything I want. Unfortunately, I can’t do the same in person. The reason isn’t economics or the availability of staff, and it isn’t the case across the board. The reason is a jumbled mess of provincial regulations that guide which types of business can be open on holidays and which can’t.

Like the original legislation that restricted Sunday shopping, mandatory holiday closures are well-intentioned — to ensure that workers can enjoy a day of rest. Except that times have changed and exceptions were made. Some make sense, some don’t. For example, allowing restaurants, pharmacies, laundromats, boat and motor vehicle rental, repair and service shops and gas stations to open means that fewer people will find themselves stranded.

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What You Know, and What You Don’t: Jackman-Atkinson

What You Know, and What You Don’t: Jackman-Atkinson

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Neepawa Banner & Press

Newspaper - Computer

In a world that’s increasingly fragmented and siloed, we need newspapers. Or at least the service they provide — a place to get a variety of news and advertising. Today, you can find out anything about anything. But what if you don’t know what you’re looking for? Or that you’re even looking for something?

This is the important role newspapers and other general interest news sources offer, be it a paper, a local newsletter, dedicated news sites, radio or the signboard at the post office. The algorithms that drive advertising on Facebook and Google are only informed by past browsing history, they can’t look into the subconscious or the future. Have you recently searched for hotel rooms in Regina? All of a sudden, you will be bombarded with ads for hotels and motels and maybe the occasional rental car too. But what about if you don’t know that you want to go to Regina for the weekend? What if you haven’t even considered taking a little holiday because you’re busy with your life and will feel regret when summer is over and you didn’t getaway? The algorithms can’t help with that.

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Missed Connection: Rural Canadians Still Waiting for Adequate Internet Speeds

Missed Connection: Rural Canadians Still Waiting for Adequate Internet Speeds

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Editor, myWestman.ca

Internet - Laptop

NEEPAWA, Man. — If you ask rural Canadians about the biggest thing holding their communities back, directly or indirectly, it almost always comes down to technology. In rural Canada, the unlimited, cheap, broadband internet and five bars of cell service urban Canadians take for granted is some combination of non-existent or expensive.

The role of connectivity is vital. It goes beyond the obvious and communities without it are at a distinct disadvantage. Almost every business is driven by information, it’s almost impossible to attract businesses to a community where accessing the broader world of customers and suppliers isn’t easy to do. It’s important for education, not just in the formal sense, but it also allows farmers and small business owners to find out about what’s going on beyond the community and how it might help their business— whether it’s market reports, news or researching new products or services. It’s a key component of the next wave of precision agriculture. High-speed internet is a crucial part of residents’ lifestyle and recreational needs.

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Good Enough: Striving for Social Media Perfection

Good Enough: Striving for Social Media Perfection

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Editor, myWestman.ca

Cell Phone - Instagram

I used to strive for perfection. I don’t anymore — not all the time at least. There are a lot of times good enough will do.

Intentional or not, everywhere, we face pressure for perfection; be it getting perfect grades, being the perfect child/parent/partner/friend, leading the perfect life. It’s baked into the core of our experience, right from the fairy tales and Disney movies we consume at a young age.

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I’ve Got a Beef: Jackman-Atkinson

I’ve Got a Beef: Jackman-Atkinson

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson, Editor, myWestman.ca

Beef - Cattle

NEEPAWA, Man. — The Canadian beef industry took a bit of flack in the regional media last week. It’s part of a larger problem — many Canadians have lost their connection to the farm and how food is produced. They don’t know what Manitoba cattle producers are actually doing and why turning our province’s pastures into fields of soy might not be the best idea.

Last summer, a study was published in Science titled, “Reducing food’s environmental impacts through producers and consumers.” The study consolidated international data from five environmental indicators, 38,700 farms and 1,600 processors, packaging types and retailers. The study concluded, “The impacts of the lowest-impact animal products typically exceed those of vegetable substitutes.” The study also points out that while livestock takes up 83 percent of farmland, they only produce 18 percent of the world’s calories. Some of the more prominent news coverage ran with pictures of cattle grazing on slashed Amazon rain forest and pushed the need to switch from animal to plant proteins.

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